The power trio comprised of guitarist Oz Noy, organist Brian Charette and drummer Ari Hoenig join forces to rock the Late Night set at Blue Note on Saturday, March 7.

Israeli-born guitarist Oz Noy is a progressive and iconoclastic artist who incorporates a wide array of styles into his own work, including funk, rock, blues, and jazz. Having performed from a young age, Noy was an in-demand studio musician by his early twenties. A move to New York City in 1996 eventually led to tours and session work with such artists as Chris Botti, Toni Braxton, Jeff “Tain” Watts, and others. Noy released his own album Ha! in 2005, followed by the live album Oz Live a year later.

New York City organist/pianist, Brian Charette, has established himself as a leading voice in modern Jazz. Charette is a Grammy-nominated, Hammond-endorsed artist who was the winner of the 2014 Downbeat Critics’ Poll Rising Star: Organ award and has climbed to 4th place in The Critic’s Poll main organ category. In 2015 Brian also won The Hot House Magazine’s Fan’s Decision Jazz Award for Best Organist in New York. His last Positone Records recording, Once and Future, reached #17 on the Jazz Week chart and was also on the Itunes new music Top 20. This Summer, Brian just released his new Circuit Bent Organ trio recording, Kürrent, featuring Ben Monder and will have a traditional Jazz organ trio release coming out on Steeplechase Records in Fall 2017.

Ari Hoenig is a jazz drummer, composer and educator known for his unusual and intense approach to drumming emphasizing complex rhythms in direct harmony with other group members. Ari is widely noted particularly for his drumming not being relegated to just keeping tempo, or being a side issue to the music he plays in, but rather for elevating drumming as an indispensable part of the performance.

Hoenig is also known for his unique ability to modify the pitch of a drum by using drum sticks, mallets, and even parts of his body (such as his hands and elbows). Using this technique, he can play any note in the chromatic scale, virtually any melody, and even improvise on a chord structure in the same way as any other instrumentalist would.

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